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"If history teaches anything, it is that government cannot be trusted to manage money." - The Nightmare German Inflation

The narrative that the Beirut explosion was an exclusive consequence of negligence and corruption by the current Lebanese government is now set in stone, at least in the Atlanticist sphere. And yet, digging deeper, we find that negligence and corruption may have been fully exploited, via sabotage, to engineer it.

Lebanon is prime John Le Carré territory. A multinational den of spies of all shades - House of Saud agents, Zionist operatives, "moderate rebel" weaponizers, Hezbollah intellectuals, debauched Arab "royalty," self-glorified smugglers - in a context of full spectrum economic disaster afflicting a member of the Axis of Resistance, a perennial target of Israel alongside Syria and Iran.

As if this were not volcanic enough, into the tragedy stepped President Trump to muddy the - already contaminated - Eastern Mediterranean waters. Briefed by "our great generals," Trump on Tuesday said: "According to them - they would know better than I would - but they seem to think it was an attack." Trump added, "it was a bomb of some kind."

Was this incandescent remark letting the cat out of the bag by revealing classified information? Or was the President launching another non sequitur?

Trump eventually walked his comments back after the Pentagon declined to confirm his claim about what the "generals" had said and his defense secretary, Mark Esper, supported the accident explanation for the blast.

It's yet another graphic illustration of the war engulfing the Beltway. Trump: attack. Pentagon: accident. "I don't think anybody can say right now," Trump said on Wednesday. "I've heard it both ways."

Still, it's worth noting a report by Iran's Mehr News Agency that four US Navy reconnaissance planes were spotted near Beirut at the time of the blasts. Is US intel aware of what really happened all along the spectrum of possibilities?

That ammonium nitrate

Security at Beirut's port - the nation's prime economic hub - would have to be considered a top priority. But to adapt a line from Roman Polanski's Chinatown: "Forget it, Jake. It's Beirut."

Those by now iconic 2,750 tons of ammonium nitrate arrived in Beirut in September 2013 on board the Rhosus, a ship under Moldovan flag sailing from Batumi in Georgia to Mozambique. Rhosus ended up being impounded by Beirut's Port State Control.

Subsequently the ship was de facto abandoned by its owner, shady businessman Igor Grechushkin, born in Russia and a resident of Cyprus, who suspiciously "lost interest" in his relatively precious cargo, not even trying to sell it, dumping style, to pay off his debts.

Grechushkin never paid his crew, who barely survived for several months before being repatriated on humanitarian grounds. The Cypriot government confirmed there was no request to Interpol from Lebanon to arrest him. The whole op feels like a cover - with the real recipients of the ammonium nitrate possibly being "moderate rebels" in Syria who use it to make IEDs and equip suicide trucks, such as the one that demolished the Al Kindi hospital in Aleppo.

The 2,750 tons - packed in 1-ton bags labeled "Nitroprill HD" - were transferred to the Hangar 12 warehouse by the quayside. What followed was an astonishing case of serial negligence.

From 2014 to 2017 letters from customs officials - a series of them - as well as proposed options to get rid of the dangerous cargo, exporting it or otherwise selling it, were simply ignored. Every time they tried to get a legal decision to dispose of the cargo, they got no answer from the Lebanese judiciary.

When Lebanese Prime Minister Hassan Diab now proclaims, "Those responsible will pay the price," context is absolutely essential.

Neither the prime minister nor the president nor any of the cabinet ministers knew that the ammonium nitrate was stored in Hangar 12, former Iranian diplomat Amir Mousavi, the director of the Center for Strategic Studies and International Relations in Tehran, confirms. We're talking about a massive IED, placed mid-city.

The bureaucracy at Beirut's port and the mafias who are actually in charge are closely linked to, among others, the al-Mostaqbal faction, which is led by former Prime Minister Saad al-Hariri, himself fully backed by the House of Saud. The immensely corrupt Hariri was removed from power in October 2019 amid serious protests. His cronies "disappeared" at least $20 billion from Lebanon's treasury - which seriously aggravated the nation's currency crisis.

No wonder the current government - where we have Prime Minister Diab backed by Hezbollah - had not been informed about the ammonium nitrate.

Ammonium nitrate is quite stable, making it one of the safest explosives used in mining. Fire normally won't set it off. It becomes highly explosive only if contaminated - for instance by oil - or heated to a point where it undergoes chemical changes that produce a sort of impermeable cocoon around it in which oxygen can build up to a dangerous level where an ignition can cause an explosion.

Why, after sleeping in Hangar 12 for seven years, did this pile suddenly feel an itch to explode?

So far, the prime straight to the point explanation, by Middle East expert Elijah Magnier, points to the tragedy being "sparked" - literally - by a clueless blacksmith with a blowtorch operating quite close to the unsecured ammonium nitrate. Unsecured due, once again, to negligence and corruption - or as part of an intentional "mistake" anticipating the possibility of a future blast.

This scenario, though, does not explain the initial "fireworks" explosion. And certainly does not explain what no one - at least in the West - is talking about: the deliberate fires set to an Iranian market in Ajam in the UAE, and also to a series of food/agricultural warehouses in Najaf, Iraq, immediately after the Beirut tragedy.

Follow the money

Lebanon - boasting assets and real estate worth trillions of dollars - is a juicy peach for global finance vultures. To grab these assets at rock bottom prices, in the middle of the New Great Depression, is simply irresistible. In parallel, the IMF vulture would embark on full shakedown mode and finally "forgive" some of Beirut's debts as long as a harsh variation of "structural adjustment" is imposed.

Who profits, in this case, are the geopolitical and geoeconomic interests of US, Saudi Arabia and France. It's no accident that President Macron, a dutiful Rothschild servant, arrived in Beirut Thursday to pledge Paris neocolonial "support" and all but impose, like a Viceroy, a comprehensive set of "reforms". A Monty Python-infused dialogue, complete with heavy French accent, might have followed along these lines:

"We want to buy your port." "It's not for sale." "Oh, what a pity, an accident just happened."

Already a month ago the IMF was "warning" that "implosion" in Lebanon was "accelerating." Prime Minister Diab had to accept the proverbial "offer you can't refuse" and thus "unlock billions of dollars in donor funds." Or else. The non-stop run on the Lebanese currency, for over a year now, was just a - relatively polite - warning.

This is happening amid a massive global asset grab characterized in the larger context by American GDP down by almost 40%, arrays of bankruptcies, a handful of billionaires amassing unbelievable profits and too-big-to-fail megabanks duly bailed out with a tsunami of free money. ...
 
Read the full article @ SOTT

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